WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT BRITAIN’S ISLAND PRISONS?

Much has been written about the UK’s mainland prisons, but what about those on its small island outposts?

See the end of the article to find out what used to be at the top of this rock. Source: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/494762709037222628/

See the end of this article to find out what used to sit atop this rock. Source: David Andrews

 

England has 90 per cent of the UK’s prisoners with Scotland and Northern Ireland accounting for most of the rest. But who pays attention to the prisons in Britain’s smaller territories?

Gibraltar, Guernsey, Jersey and the Isle of Man had a total of 359 prisoners between them in November 2014 according to the International Centre for Prison Studies.

But first of all, some of you are probably wondering exactly where these island territories are, so here is a helpful map. They are rather small, so we have used very large arrows.

 

Map of UK's small island territories in Europe. Source: Prison Watch UK and http://www.worldatlasbook.com/

Map of UK’s small island territories in Europe. Source: Prison Watch UK and World Atlas Book

 

WHO LOCKS UP WHOM?

People are least likely to be locked up on the Isle of Man, which jails only 95 per 100,000 inhabitants. Gibraltar and Guernsey are far more likely to throw you in the slammer with rates of 146 and 148 respectively.

 

UK ISLAND TERRITORIES’ PRISON STATISTICS

UK island territories prison stats

Source: International Centre for Prison Studies – November 2014

 

Jersey is the only one to have juvenile detainees, Guernsey has the highest percentage of female prisoners and Gibraltar has the most foreign ones.

As for the UK’s prison overcrowding problem, Jersey is currently using just over half of its 243 capacity while the Isle of Man is using only 60 per cent of its 138 spaces. Anyone fancy a change of scenery?

 

P.S. – A LITTLE EUROPEAN HISTORY

Gibraltar used a Moorish Castle as its prison for well over a hundred years. It was described as “defective in many points” in an 1867 report, but was used until a new prison opened in 2010. As you can see from the picture at the top of this post, it had a pretty intimidating location.

 

TWITTER: @PRISONWATCHUK 
FACEBOOK: FACEBOOK.COM/PRISONWATCHUK


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s