Prisons in Parliament – 27th July

Radicalisation, diseases, resettlement prisons, compensation paid, reoffending and more  

Parly pic

 

Prisons in Parliament brings you up-to-date on the last week of politics and prisons. What’s been said? And by whom? Find out here…

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1) Radicalisation in prison 

Lord Trefgarne (Conservative) asked what progress has been made with regard to the running of the Ibaana Programme to tackle extremism and radicalisation in prisons.

Lord Faulks (Conservative), the Minister of State for Justice, said:

“The Secretary of State decided to halt the proposed de-radicalisation programme Ibanna as its approach is not consistent with the principles” set out in two of the Prime Minister’s recent speeches.”

The Secretary of State has also asked the Ministry of Justice whether the Ibaana programme should be replaced and if so, what a replacement should look like.

Read the full response here.

 

2) Diseases in prison and detention centres 

Baroness Suttie (LibDem), asked how many cases or outbreaks of reportable diseases in prisons and immigration removal centres have occurred in each of the last three years.

Lord Prior of Brampton (Conservative) provided the table below on the number of reportable single cases of infection per setting from 2012-2014.

Custodial setting Year
2014 2013 2012
Prisons 1,208 1,630 600
Immigration Removal Centres 60 38 30

Note: the increase in reported cases in prisons from 2012-2013 is due to improvements in reporting Hepatitis C infection. There were over 300 cases of hepatitis C reported during 2013.

The number of outbreaks of infection in prisons and immigration removal centres reported from 2012-14 are presented in the table below.

The number of outbreaks of infection in prisons and immigration removal centres reported to PHE from 2012-14 are presented in the table below.

Custodial setting Year
2014 2013 2012
Prisons 26 21 26
Immigration Removal Centres 3 2 1
Read the full response here.
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3) New prison capacity   

Lord Falconer of Thornton (Labour) asked what new additional capacity in the adult prison estate is planned or under construction and when each additional space will be ready for use.

Lord Faulks (Conservative) said the government wanted to close old prisons and build new ones. Current developments include:

  • 1,250 new places at four new house-blocks (at Peterborough, Parc, Thameside and The Mount prisons)
  • a new 2,106 place prison for North Wales in Wrexham, to be opened in 2017

Lord Faulks said the government is “committed to ensuring that there are enough places for offenders sentenced to custody by the courts.”

Read the full response here.

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4) First time offenders 

Philip Davies (Conservative) asked what proportion of defendants with no previous convictions or cautions were given a custodial sentence for a first offence in magistrates’ courts in 2014.

Andrew Selous (Conservative), the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice, said “offenders with no previous convictions, are generally less likely to receive an immediate custodial sentence than a repeat offender.”

Only 1.7 per cent were given an immediate custodial sentence in 2014.

Number and proportion of offenders(1) with no previous convictions or cautions(2) who were sentenced to an immediate custodial sentence for a first offence in a magistrates court, 2010 to 2014.
Year ending December Immediate custodial sentence All disposals(3) Proportion given an immediate custodial sentence
2014 931 54,030 1.7%
Source: Ministry of Justice, Police National Computer (PNC)

Read the full response here.

 

5) Resettlement prisons 

Lord Falconer of Thornton (Labour) asked what percentage of offenders within three months of the end of their sentence are currently in resettlement prisons. He also asked about the usable operational capacity in each prison designated as a resettlement prison.

Lord Faulks (Conservative) said that as of 26 June 2015, 95 per cent of offenders aged 18 and over with less than three months to serve were held in a designated resettlement prison.

He said it was not possible to provide the usable operational capacity of each resettlement prison. But he did provide a table with the operational capacity of each resettlement prison as at 26 June 2015 that you can find here.

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6) Compensation paid to prisoners 

Philip Davies (Conservative) asked how much compensation has been paid to prisoners in each of the last five years and why it had been paid.

But Andrew Selous (Conservative) said that information was not available and could only be gathered “at disproportionate cost”.

He said the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) holds the information for public prisons in England & Wales but not for private ones. NOMS’ records “do not record the actual amount of compensation paid out to prisoners separately.”

Read the full answer here.

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7) Harris review: when will government respond? 

Lord Judd (Labour) asked when the government was planning to respond to each of the recommendations in the report of the Harris Review Changing Prisons, Saving Lives.

Lord Faulks (Conservative) said “will consider Lord Harris’ recommendations very carefully and respond to the report in the autumn.”

Read the full answer here.

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8) The most previous convictions 

Philip Davies (Conservative) asked about the highest number of previous convictions for a range of serious crimes from robbery to sexual abuse to knife crimes over the past ten years. He also asked what the sentence was for the most recent offence.

Andrew Selous (Conservative), responded with this very detailed table. It shows the highest number of previous convictions of an offender convicted of the same offence and the sentence received for the most recent offence in England and Wales, 2005 – 2014.

The individual with the highest number of previous convictions for theft from 2010 to 2014 is the same individual.

Table 1: The highest number of previous convictions1,2 of an offender convicted of the same offence and the sentence received for the most recent offence in England and Wales, 2005 – 2014
Year Offence type Highest number of previous convictions for same offence type Sentence for most recent offence
2005 Rape 2 Immediate Custody
Knife Offences 10 Immediate Custody
Robbery 9 Immediate Custody
Theft 233 Immediate Custody
Violence against the Person 23 Immediate Custody
Sexual offences involving a child 5 Immediate Custody
2006 Rape 3 Immediate Custody
Knife Offences 15 Community Sentence
Robbery 6 Immediate Custody
Theft 238 Immediate Custody
Violence against the Person 25 Immediate Custody
Sexual offences involving a child 8 Immediate Custody
2007 Rape 3 Immediate custody
Knife Offences 16 Community Sentence
Robbery 9 Immediate custody
Theft 240 Fine
Violence against the Person 17 Fine
Sexual offences involving a child 5 Fine
Sexual offences involving a child 5 Immediate custody
2008 Rape 2 Immediate custody
Knife Offences 12 Community Sentence
Robbery 8 Immediate custody
Theft 245 Other3
Violence against the Person 14 Immediate custody
Sexual offences involving a child 8 Immediate custody
2009 Rape 2 Immediate custody
Knife Offences 13 Community Sentence
Robbery 7 Immediate custody
Theft 249 Immediate custody
Violence against the Person 19 Immediate custody
Sexual offences involving a child 8 Immediate custody
2010 Rape 2 Immediate custody
Knife Offences 11 Immediate custody
Robbery 8 Immediate Custody
Theft 172 Immediate custody
Violence against the Person 27 Immediate custody
Sexual offences involving a child 6 Immediate custody
2011 Rape 2 Immediate Custody
Knife Offences 16 Immediate Custody
Robbery 8 Immediate Custody
Theft 183 Immediate Custody
Violence against the Person 30 Immediate Custody
Sexual offences involving a child 12 Immediate Custody
2012 Rape 2 Immediate Custody
Knife Offences 17 Immediate Custody
Robbery 7 Immediate Custody
Theft 188 Fully Suspended
Violence against the Person 37 Immediate Custody
Sexual offences involving a child 7 Immediate Custody
2013 Rape 2 Immediate Custody
Knife Offences 10 Fully suspended
Robbery 8 Immediate Custody
Theft 203 Immediate Custody
Violence against the Person 19 Immediate Custody
Sexual offences involving a child 8 Immediate Custody
2014 Rape 3 Immediate Custody
Knife Offences 18 Immediate Custody
Robbery 10 Immediate Custody
Theft 210 Immediate Custody
Violence against the Person 22 Immediate Custody
Sexual offences involving a child 6 Immediate Custody
Data Source: Ministry of Justice copy of the Police National Computer
1. Figures are based on counting the number of occasions on which offenders have previously received a conviction recorded on the Police National Computer, including some offences committed outside of England and Wales. Where there were multiple offences on the same occassion, only the primary offence as recorded on the Police National Computer would be counted.
2. All data have been taken from the MoJ extract of the Police National Computer. This includes details of all convictions, cautions, reprimands or warnings given for recordable offences (see http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2000/1139/schedule/made for definition). It is therefore possible that some offenders presented in the table above have previously also received convictions for offences not recorded on the PNC.
3. Includes some deferred sentences that the police will update on the Police National computer at a later date when the final decision is known.
4. Where offenders have the same number of previous convictions but different disposals for the most recent offence, these have been shown separately.

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Keep an eye out for our new weekly post, Prisons in Parliament. 



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