Prisons in parliament

What is being done to address rising reoffending rates? Under scrutiny this week.

Short sentences under scrutiny. Image: Joe Gratz

Prisons in Parliament brings you up-to-date on the last week of politics and prisons. What’s been said? And by whom? Get it all here. 

Rehabilitation for those on short sentences

What rehabilitation programmes are available for people serving prison sentences of 12 months or less? Asked Richard Burgon, shadow justice secretary. 

“Those serving sentences of under 12 months in custody have access to education; work; offending behaviour programmes; health services, including help with drugs or alcohol problems; and resettlement support in custody and into the community” said Sam Gyimah, under-secretary of state for justice. 

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In context

Despite access to the services outlined by Mr Gyimah, our prisons have a poor record for reducing reoffending. 46 per cent of adults are reconvicted within one year of release. For those serving sentences of less than 12 months this increases to 60 per cent.

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Penalties for private prisons

How many performance points have HM Prisons Oakwood and Birmingham each year, since 2012? Asked Louise Haigh MP.

“Performance of all providers is closely monitored and we will not hesitate to take action where standards fall short” said Mr Gyimah.

Performance points per year since 2012:

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In context

Performance points are awarded when performance targets are not met. If the total number of points exceed the number agreed in the contract, then financial remedies are applied at the end of each quarter.

In 2014-15 HMP Birmingham received 25 performance points and were fined £14976.52 for a failure to comply with procedures. In 2015-16 however, despite incurring 103 performance points for the same category, no financial penalties were incurred.  Click here for the full break down of financial penalties incurred by  HM Prisons Oakwood and Birmingham.

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Gang violence in prison

Amanda Solloway MP asked what steps are being taken to educate first time offenders about gang culture and to prevent them becoming involved.

Sam Gyimah suggested that when young people come to prison it can help them leave gangs behind. He outlined the measures in place to achieve this.

“All offenders entering prison participate in induction programmes designed to help them make the most from their time in that prison. Some prisons have appointed a gangs officer, and prison staff work closely with the police to respond where gang members are coming into prison” he said.

 

 


One Comment on “Prisons in parliament”

  1. In respect of the comment: “Those serving sentences of under 12 months in custody have access to education; work; offending behaviour programmes; health services, including help with drugs or alcohol problems; and resettlement support in custody and into the community” by Sam Gyimah, under-secretary of state for justice.
    What about the many prisoners who spend such short periods of time in prison that absolutely no rehabilitative programme can be undertaken by them at all? Extremely short term prisoners will still have re-integration issues unaddressed where they carry the burden of a prison sentence on their record. For example, few employers will ask how long they served in prison. They will be concerned with whether they have committed a custodial offence or not.

    Like


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